Students walking out of Lehigh University's Packard Lab

Three Lehigh Engineering Students Receive Prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

The Lehigh students and one recent alumna are among the 2,051 students offered fellowships in 2019.

Photography by

Christa Neu

Three Lehigh engineering students have received National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships.

Michelle Kent ’19, Shira Morosohk ’18 and Sydney Yang ’19 have been awarded the prestigious grants, which recognize research potential in women pursuing master’s and doctoral degrees in bioengineering, materials science and mechanical engineering.

NSF Graduate Research Fellows receive a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 plus a three-year, $12,000 cost-of-education allowance paid to their respective institutions. Applicants must be undergraduate seniors or first-year or early second-year graduate students.

Kent will begin a Ph.D. program in metallurgy at Colorado School of Mines in the fall, Morosohk is currently a doctoral student in Lehigh’s department of mechanical engineering and mechanics, and Yang will enter a doctoral program in bioengineering at the University of Maryland, College Park. Daniella Fodera '18, who studied bioengineering at Lehigh and is currently pursuing graduate studies at Cornell University, also received the fellowship this year.

Click here to read the full story.

Photography by

Christa Neu

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