Correspondence

Letters from our readers

Correction 

Just received this edition in the mail—truly appreciate the insights and coverage of all things Lehigh!

ROTC

From left, Ryan Paradise ’20, David Sadvary '19 (Lafayette), Kobe Miller '19 and Dominique Voitek '20.

But I need to note that you misidentified a cadet in the beautiful, two-page cover picture for the “Forged in Fire” article. 

The cadet on the far left is Ryan Paradise ’20, not Brian Matus. He is a third-generation Army ROTC cadet (both parents and both grandfathers served after graduating from the University of Notre Dame’s ROTC program).

Thank you.

Robin Paradise 

Editor’s note: Thank you for the note, Robin. We regret the error and are happy to republish the photo, in order to give Ryan his just due.

A Better Opening Line?

“Move over triangle, circle, square and rectangle: There’s a new shape in town” would have been a good opening line for your “Nature Reveals a New Shape” cover story—IF the new shape had been a similar FLAT,  plane geometry figure like those four. But Javier Buceta’s new “scutoid” shape is a solid, three-dimensional shape—made abundantly clear by the article’s four diagrams, one computer-generated image, one photo of a colorful, physical model, plus the front cover illustration. Not to mention (though I will) the story’s seven (Count ’em, seven!) uses of the word-phrase “three-dimensional,” plus two 3Ds.  

Given all this three-dimensionality in the article, wouldn’t a better opening line have been “Move over PYRAMID, SPHERE, CUBE, CYLINDER and CONE?” And shouldn’t Dr. Buceta have told the New Yorker “...geometry has been around forever—the CUBE, the SPHERE”—rather than
“...the square, the circle?” I say “Yes,” even though I’m not a mathematician or an associate professor of bioengineering and chemical and biomolecular engineering—but merely a retired elementary school teacher trained by Lehigh’s 1965-66 School of
Education’s master’s degree intern program. 

Richard Siegelman ’66

Kudos for the Lehigh Bulletin 

My daughter, Megan ’97, just gave me her copy of the Fall Lehigh Bulletin. And your GO brochure, too. To say I was impressed would be an understatement. These are extremely well done and truly engaging. Perhaps the best I’ve ever read. Congratulations.

The Go Campaign

Go: The Campaign for Lehigh was publicly launched in October. 

Although I’m not a Lehigh grad, I used to audit courses and utilize your business school for consulting. And with Megan’s tuition expenses, I’m feeling invested in Lehigh.

Plus, Lehigh was a client of our company for about 70+ years, so our love is deep.  Most of the donor plaques throughout the campus were provided by my company.

 I say all this to let you know that your messaging is as good as it gets.  Truly engaging, which means your “Action” will certainly have the
“Impact” you seek. And to the critics who saw past issues as slanted (not to their personal perspectives and generation), their comments, although sought, surely are myopic. I’ll look forward to your future issues.

Jon Dubbs

Remembering the Rifle Team

I have noticed over recent issues that you, upon occasion, have delved into the deep history of our university.

The Rifle Team

Editor's Note: Thank you for the note Win. We were able to find this photo of the Lehigh Rifle Team in the 1975 Epitome.

I would like one sport to be so honored, for posterity before it is lost completely: the nationally ranked Lehigh Rifle Team. Competing against the best of the nation’s military, the Lehigh Rifle Team performed well, and at times, outstandingly.

It would be nice to see it historically put to rest before all of its dusty trophies are “recycled” into oblivion. In the 1980s the administration surreptitiously downgraded it from a Lehigh sport to a club. From there, it was but a flick of a finger into oblivion.

Coincidently, my son Brian ’83 was the last co-captain and his wife, Christine Mason, was one of the co-ed members. They are not aware of this missive, but might be a resource for locating very knowledgeable members still within the alumni. 

Kindest regards,

Win Applegate ’57

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